Fat Bitch: Week 2, Reclaiming the FAT word

How to be a Fat Bitch E-Course, by Rachele at the Nearsighted Owl
My homework from week 1
Our assignment this week or rather last week, because I’m woefully behind is to reclaim the word, “fat.”

Reclaim the word fat and do something amazing with it. Make art, take photos of yourself with fat written on you, bake a cake with fat written in frosting, etc.

I have to admit I struggled with this one. I wanted to do something cool, but also meaningful to me and my experience as a fat and fierce lady.

Then it hit me. BUTTONS. As one a’ them Generation X, third-wave, intersectional feminist, riot grrrls in the 90s and early 2000s, I wore my heart on my sweater. Little, 1″ buttons proclaiming my devotion for beloved bands, causes and sentiments adorned every outfit.

I still wear buttons, not quite as religiously or, if I’m honest pretentiously, but for me, it’s still the perfect way to express myself and my acceptance of the “fat” word openly…with flair.

I also thought it would also be a fun way to share with my classmates and friends. Contact me in the comments if you’d like one. I’ll send out the first 10 requested for free, after they’ll be $2 a piece to cover the materials and shipping.

I’ll post pictures of the finished product in my Fat Bitch: Week 3 Fashion assignment. You can preview the template here.

fatbutton

In closing, (har!) I would like to quote a bit from Rachele’s vlog for this assignment. I think she quite eloquently states my feelings about using the word “fat” as a neutral description of myself and also a political and social statement.

Describing myself as fat is empowering. I am saying that I know who I am, I know what my body looks like and what it is. I am fat. Fat is not a negative word to me. It has become my identity and it is an accurate and truthful description – a neutral description (like tall, brunette, freckly or brown-eyed). It’s not about putting a pretty bow on what I know or sugarcoating or hiding behind words like curvy or big. I also refuse to be called overweight or obese. That buys into the BMI bullshit and that my weight is an indication of health. Because I don’t have extra weight and am not over a predetermined body size.
Everyone, regardless of size or shape, should be free from oppression and treated with respect. The fact that I am fat doesn’t determine my worth or how I should live my life. I deserve to be able to use a word that doesn’t indicate any negative connotations or euphemisms – again a neutral description. The word fat needs to be separated from the assumption that someone is unkempt, lazy or less-than. That is a meaning that was taught to us and reinforced so money can be made and bigotry could be justified.
  • Cty

    These are great! Creative and classy.

  • lateshoes

    Thanks so much! I’m happy to send you one if you email me your address. tracy [at] lateshoes [dot] com